Summer Program 2018: Libraries Rock!

Summer Reading at Argyle Free Library

Summer Reading 2018 (1)

The theme of the summer reading program this year is "Libraries Rock," a music theme. We've tried to incorporate music into our summer reading programs and activities list

 

For more information, read below: 


 

Summer Program Events

Events list 

All events take place at the library unless otherwise noted 

 July 9
11 am- 3 pm
 Kickoff Party 

July 16 
11 am
Puppet People 

 July 23 
 11 am 
Nature Tunes and Tales

 August 13
11 am
Highland Herps 


 

Age 1 to Pre-K and Grades K-5

 

We have a list of fun (and educational) summer reading activities designed to broaden your child's horizons and increase their reading skills! 

For every item completed on the list:
  
1.) Your child will get one entry in the "get out of a library fine free card" drawing that we will hold each week 
2.)  Your child will get one entry in the grand prize drawing (summer fun box)
3.) Your child will get one prize from the prize drawer 

Activities List 

Each item can only be completed once, and only one book can count towards each item.

Audiobooks count as reading a book!

Reading to your child counts as reading a book!

  1. Come to a summer program event
  2. Read at the library
  3. Watch a movie that has a character who plays music
  4. Listen to music
  5. Read a book with “song” or “music” in the title
  6. Read a book about music
  7. Read a comic book or graphic novel
  8. Listen to an audiobook
  9. Read to a stuffed animal
  10. Read with a friend or sibling
Pen Pal Program 

We've partnered with a library in Argyle, Wisconsin this summer. For every letter a child writes, they get an entry in our weekly drawing for a “get out of a library fine free” card and a prize from the prize drawer. 


 

Grades 6-8 and Grades 9-12

We have a list of fun summer reading activities for you to complete! For each activity completed, you get: 
  
1.)  One entry in the "get out of a library fine free card" drawing that we will hold each week 
2.)  One entry in the grand prize drawing for a tablet 
3.) One prize from the prize drawer  

 

Activites List 

Each item can only be completed once, and only one book can count towards each item

Audiobooks count as reading a book!

  1. Read a graphic novel or comic book
  2. Listen to music
  3. Read a biography or memoir about a musician
  4. Watch a musical
  5. Attend a library program
  6. Read a book with “song” or “music” in the title
  7. Listen to an audiobook
  8. Read a book written by an author of a different race, ethnicity, or religion from your own
  9. Read a poem
  10. Read a nonfiction book

 

Ages 19 and up

We have a list of fun summer reading activities for you to complete! For each activity completed, you get:     1.)  One entry in the "get out of a library fine free card" drawing that we will hold each week  2.)  One entry in the grand prize drawing  3.) One prize from the prize drawer    
Activites List 
Each item can only be completed once, and only one book can count towards each item Audiobooks count as reading a book!
  1. Read a graphic novel or comic book
  2. Listen to music
  3. Read a biography or memoir about a musician
  4. Watch a musical
  5. Attend a library program
  6. Read a book that has "song" or "music" in the title
  7. Read a book in translation (a book not originally written in English)
  8. Read a book written by an author of a different race, ethnicity, or religion from your own
  9. Read a book set in a place you’ve never been to (Ex: England, France, Ohio)
  10. Read a memoir or biography about a composer or musician

 

FAQs

When does the program start? 

The summer reading program starts on May 15th and ends August 15th

Why summer reading is important: Preventing summer slide 

 Summer slide, also referred to as summer loss or summer setback, occurs during summer vacation. On average, students who don't read can lose up to two months of learning by the time they return to school in the fall. This puts them behind their peers. Children who participate in summer reading programs and read a minimum of six books over the summer score higher in reading and math when they return to school in the fall. 

What if my child is too young for school or too young to read? 

At just a few months of age, an infant can look at pictures, listen to your voice, and point to objects on cardboard pages. Guide your child by pointing to the pictures, and say the names of the various objects. By drawing attention to pictures and associating the words with both pictures and the real-world objects, your child will learn the importance of language.

Children learn to love the sound of language before they even notice the existence of printed words on a page. Reading books aloud to children stimulates their imagination and expands their understanding of the world. It helps them develop language and listening skills and prepares them to understand the written word. When the rhythm and melody of language become a part of a child's life, learning to read will be as natural as learning to walk and talk.

Even after children learn to read by themselves, it's still important for you to read aloud together. By reading stories that are on their interest level, but beyond their reading level, you can stretch young readers' understanding and motivate them to improve their skills.